Tag Archives: Employment

On schedule

Source: The National

By GYNNIE KERO 


Oil Search Ltd is confident the APEC Haus taking shape in Port Moresby will be completed well before the contracted deadline – July 31.
Its construction at Ela Beach is paid for through Oil Search’s tax credit scheme for K120 million and Construction Project Build (CPB) Company is leading the work.
APEC Haus project manager Peter Kearsley said 65 per cent of the building was completed.
“Yes, the project is on budget,” he said. “The next thing you will see is glass go up at the start of February.
“Now having had the roof on, we are able to work on the ground floor.
“Contracted deadline is July 31, the guys will definitely beat that. It will be finished before the end of July.”
Prime Minister Peter O’Neill yesterday said APEC Haus would be converted into a world-class museum after the leaders’ meeting in November.
He also highlighted that more than 80 per cent of the project workers were locals. “Many of our artefact, thousands of years old and held in museums (elsewhere), we want to bring back here,” O’Neill said.

Doctors call off strike

By GYNNIE KERO, REBECCA KUKU and HELEN TARAWA 


A PLANNED strike by doctors has been called off after the Government yesterday met four of their seven demands including the payment of K1.3 million to cover their insurance premiums.
National Doctors Association secretary Dr Sam Yockopua told The National last night the three remaining demands “are in process”.
“We are satisfied so we will continue work,” he said.
The strike by association members, which Health and HIV/AIDS Minister Sir Puka Temu and Personnel Department Secretary John Kali said would have been illegal, was to have started yesterday.
Sir Puka confirmed that K1.3mil had been paid and all the other demands were administrative matters which would be addressed.
“We have paid the premium insurance and we will address the other administrative issues as soon as possible,” he said.
Doctors this week threatened to withdraw their services in a nationwide strike if their sevens demands were not addressed immediately. They had submitted the same seven demands to the government earlier this year but received no response.
The demands are that:

  • An outstanding insurance premium of K1.13 million to be paid before close of business on Dec 14 (yesterday);
  • the outstanding NDA awards for national medical academics, the money managed by the University of PNG, to be paid by close of business on Pay 26 of 2017;
  • the State to show commitment to honour the award and facilitate the NDA HOS which includes financial contributions;
  • all doctors must have their contracts signed, gratuity calculations and payments done in compliance to the existing agreement by Pay 26 of 2017;
  • all doctors who have been employed must have their appointments confirmed, salaries and remuneration packages sorted out, and those seeking employment in the public sector must be promoted;
  • all outstanding rentals to be paid before close of business yesterday (Dec 14); and,
  • All outstanding claims by service providers must be paid by the end of the year.

 

Kali told The National that the strike threat strike contravened the Public Services Act and the General Orders. He said it would have breached an agreement signed between the doctors and the government which stipulated that doctors were engaged in an essential service and must ensure that their services were not hindered or interrupted by any industrial action.

Kuman wants teachers to increase to 70,000

By PHOEBE GWANGILO 


EDUCATION Minister Nick Kuman, pictured, wants the number of teachers to be increased from 56,000 to 70,000 to cater for the increase in the number of students.
This would ensure a “reasonable teacher-student ratio”.
“In my own calculation, with two million students in our school system, we need at least 70,000 teachers,” Kuman said.
Last year a head teacher of a primary school in Port Moresby told The National that a teacher was teaching 60 to 80 students in a classroom.
“We are silently killing ourselves in the classroom,” she said.
“The normal minimum teacher-student ratio should be one teacher to 36 or maximum 45 students.”
Kuman said the current ratio was one teacher to more than 50 students which must be reduced in secondary, primary and elementary schools.
“In secondary schools, we look at one teacher to 30 to 35 students,” he said.
“In primary schools, one teacher to 30 to 45 students in the classroom.
“Ideal ratio of teacher-student interaction is very important.”
“We graduate close to 2,000 teachers each year. About 300 to 400 teachers come out of the system.
“There is plus there but we need to train a lot more teachers to bridge that gap to have proper teacher-student ratio.”
Next week, Kuman will be in India to recruit specialised teachers in mathematics and science.

Simulator Plant Constructed For Kumul Petroleum Academy

Source: Post Courier
November 14, 2017
BY JEFFREY ELAPA

The simulated safe live processing plant (SLPP) at the Kumul Petroleum Academy at Idubada near Port Moresby would be fully commissioned by the New Year after work started on it this week.


It (SLPP) will be the first to be installed in the region to train oil and gas technicians and operators in PNG.


The SLPP plant or simulator is specifically designed to train and equip young trainees as in a real work place like the processing facilities that are in Hides and Kutubu.


The construction and installation of the processing plant was witnessed by chief secretary and chairman of Kumul Petroleum Academy Isaac Lupari, Kumul Petroleum Holdings Limited managing director Wapu Sonk and CEO and managing director of Site Group International Vern Wills yesterday.


The training facility was bought at a total cost of more than K4 million for trainee students to use for their training purpose which is similar to the processing plants at Kutubu and Hides.


So far there are 32 students undertaking the 15 months training of which 16 of them were funded by ExxonMobil while the other 16 trainees were funded by Kumul Petroleum Holding Limited.


Site Group International technical manager, Michael Costelloe said the facility is like a real work situation in which there will be a main control centre to control the processing plant.
He said instead of oil and gas, the facility will use air, water and oil which will be passed through a mixture which will be transported to a oil processor to separate the oil, air and water as in a real processing plant where oil, gas and water is separated.


Mr Costelloe said by having the facility like that will help better train and equip the trainees as they face the real life experience at the work place.


Mr Sonk said the installation of the stimulated safe live processing plant will not only train trainees for the oil and gas projects but other fields also.


The Prime Minister Mr Peter O’Neill will commission the facility in February next year.

Panguna work to cost K18.8 billion

Source: The National

CONSTRUCTION of the Panguna mine is estimated to cost US$4-6 billion (K12.5- K18.8 billion).

 
Bougainville Copper Ltd (BCL) secretary Mark Hitchcock said significant tax revenue would be generated in the estimated 25-plus years’ mine life, with operations starting around 2025-26.

 
Hitchcock spoke during the Autonomous Bougainville Government’s (ABG) three-day tax and revenue summit in Buka last week aimed at finding ways to improve the financial outlook for the region and the government’s ability to fund services for its people.

 
Hitchcock was invited to present development of a new Panguna mining project, including its potential revenue and broader economic benefits.

 
Once developed, the mine would generate significant tax revenue over the 25-plus years operational life of the project.

 
The presentation was drawn from an order of magnitude study which was updated late last year.

 
A realistic timeline for the Panguna project will see the mine operational around 2025-26, Hitchcock said, and the potential tax revenue gains had to be viewed as a longer term prospect with no short-term, direct tax generation, although the project’s development and construction period would present income generation opportunities.

 
Hitchcock highlighted the need for certainty in relation to the tax regime that would apply to the project and warned that excessive tax imposts would undermine its viability. “One potential pathway is for the ABG and PNG national government to work towards a joint agreement to provide assurances regarding applicable taxes that would apply over the longterm,” Hitchcock said.

 
In addition to tax revenue, he said the Panguna project would have a wider multiplier effect in terms of economic benefit.

 
“A project of this scale will help stimulate the economy in a multitude of ways in areas such as training and employment, new business opportunities in the supply of goods and services and the provision of new infrastructure to name a few,” he said.

 
Hitchcock congratulated the ABG for holding the tax and revenue summit and said BCL welcomed opportunities to contribute to important policy discussions in Bougainville.

Government Cuts Rice Imports

05:00PM 


BY GORETHY KENNETH of Post-Courier

Annually the government is spending K600million to import rice.

 

The government plans to cut the import of rice despite an increase of 5 percent annually in consumption.

 

IT will take at least five years for Papua New Guinea to start producing and exporting its own rice and for the eight million people to consume.

 

Agriculture Minister Benny Allen in his response to Menyamya MP Thomas Pelika said there are at least five companies that are in the process of producing rice locally – one of which is Naime Rice.

 

Minister Allen was taken to task by Mr Pelika during Question Time in Parliament about the Government’s plans to have rice grown locally and help with job creation for provinces like Menyamya.

Special economic zone eyed for Manus

Source: The National

THE Government will develop a special economic zone on Manus to address job and internal revenue losses following the shutdown of the asylum refugee center.

 
National Planning and Monitoring Minister Richard Maru, pictured, said internal revenue for Manus would decrease from K25 million to K1.5 million per annum following the closure.

 
“About 1200 jobs will be lost, 100 small-to-medium enterprises will go out of business,” he said.
“The Government will set a special economic zone for Manus.

 
“We will put money in the 2018 budget to start the marine park on the west coast of Manus.

 
“We will also put money to plant 40,000 rubber trees on Manus.
“Most areas have been logged.

 
“We took stock of this.

 
“We now need to find investors to go into Manus to put up the fish (tuna) plant.”
The minister was responding to Manus Governor Charlie Benjamin on the Government’s fall-back plan for Manus as some refugees had already began the island province.

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