Tag Archives: Education

Government to leave for India

Source: Loop PNG

The Minister for National Planning and Monitoring, Richard Maru, is set to lead an official PNG delegation fact finding mission to India from December 11-15, 2017.

 

The high profile Government delegation includes senior state ministers in the likes of the Minister for Education, Nick Kuman, Minister for Inter-Government Relations, Kevin Isifu, Minister for Information, Communication, Technology and Energy, Sam Basil, and Governor for West New Britain, Sasindran Muthuvel.

 

Other senior government officials traveling with the delegation include Electoral Commissioner Patilias Gamato and acting registrar general of the Civil and Identity Registry, Michael Kumung.

 

Reiterating that a key focus of the O’Neill-Abel Government is to grow the economy, Minister Maru said the delegation is going to seek business opportunities and technical assistance from India to support PNG’s development agenda.

 

Minister Maru added that the Government is also working to ensure that support exists for sectors such as energy, information and communication technology (ICT), health, education, law and justice and capacity development.

 

The training of Papua New Guinea’s human resources and development of research capabilities are also critical in this endeavour.

“India is one of the fastest growing economies in the world and one that has demonstrated success. The PNG delegation mission will look at how best we can replicate and harness some of the positive pathways that India has taken and can offer to PNG,” Minister Maru said.

Author: Press release

Kuman wants teachers to increase to 70,000

By PHOEBE GWANGILO 


EDUCATION Minister Nick Kuman, pictured, wants the number of teachers to be increased from 56,000 to 70,000 to cater for the increase in the number of students.
This would ensure a “reasonable teacher-student ratio”.
“In my own calculation, with two million students in our school system, we need at least 70,000 teachers,” Kuman said.
Last year a head teacher of a primary school in Port Moresby told The National that a teacher was teaching 60 to 80 students in a classroom.
“We are silently killing ourselves in the classroom,” she said.
“The normal minimum teacher-student ratio should be one teacher to 36 or maximum 45 students.”
Kuman said the current ratio was one teacher to more than 50 students which must be reduced in secondary, primary and elementary schools.
“In secondary schools, we look at one teacher to 30 to 35 students,” he said.
“In primary schools, one teacher to 30 to 45 students in the classroom.
“Ideal ratio of teacher-student interaction is very important.”
“We graduate close to 2,000 teachers each year. About 300 to 400 teachers come out of the system.
“There is plus there but we need to train a lot more teachers to bridge that gap to have proper teacher-student ratio.”
Next week, Kuman will be in India to recruit specialised teachers in mathematics and science.

K60 million TFF fees to be paid next year

EDUCATION Minister Nick Kuman says the final payment of K60 million in tuition fee-free funds will be paid to school next year.
“There was a balance of K60 million. We got some money in the account but we won’t pay. We will hold on to the money and allow schools to close on Friday,” he said.
“This money will be available as soon as they start school next. I did that last year for this year. And I’m going to do that this year for next year, because the schools will be closed.
“They won’t need it to run operations. It might go to the wrong hands if we give now. It will be in the central bank account.
“It will be quarantined until the schools open next year the money will be available and they can pay all the outstanding bills incurred in the last three months.”
Kuman said the TFF was the only education fund managed at the national level. Other funds are disbursed to provinces to manage.
In September, Secretary Dr Uke Kombra said Government had budgeted more than K600 million for this year’s TFF.
“In 2017 we got a budget of K602 million so at the end of term two, we disbursed close to K300 million. Every term we are disbursing K150 million.”

NO CUTS TO CORE NATIONAL PRIORITIES, SAYS PM

28 November 2017

Source: Post-Courier

Prime Minister Peter O’Neill said the 2018 National Budget is based on common sense and restraint, and builds on the proactive manner in which the Government has managed the recent global economic pressures.

 

“When we formed the Government in Alotau, we promised to deliver stable and sensible administration, and you can see that commitment evident in this budget,” the Prime Minister said ahead of the tabling of the budget by the Treasurer in Parliament this week.

 

“In this budget, there will be no cuts to our core national priorities, particularly education and healthcare.

 

“We will deliver a productive and safe APEC summit in 2018 through modest expenditure that builds capacity and leaves the legacy in our Government agencies.

 

“Our Government will also continue to build more efficient public services that are increasingly capable while being less expensive to operate. I am looking forward to sensible debate about the budget that is based on fact and not misinformation.”

 

Mr O’Neill said while pressure on the economy from global factors is easing, the Government will continue to ensure fiscal discipline is maintained.

 

“There is no doubt that we are seeing improvements in the global economy, and this is reflected in positive indicators in our own economy.

 

“Commodity prices are returning to healthier levels but there is still a long way to go before we can relax.

 

“When global conditions were at their lowest, our Government managed the challenges we faced and this has placed us in a stronger position today. We continued to maintain positive economic growth through a program of reducing spending, managing expenses and rescheduling some infrastructure construction,” the PM said.

 

“It is because of our responsible approach that we can deliver the budget that will be presented to the Parliament this week.

 

“The Treasurer, working with all Cabinet members, and Treasury officials, has developed a very responsible budget that takes account of current global challenges.

 

“I congratulate our Treasurer and Deputy Prime Minister, Charles Abel, and look forward to the delivery of his first budget speech on Tuesday.”

New Bill Passed 

Parliament today (24/11/17) passed the Pacific Institute of Leadership and Governance Bill with 85 votes to nil.

 

 

The Bill repeals the Papua New Guinea Institute of Public Administration Act 1993.

 

This means the Administrative College known as ADCOL, at Waigani, will now be changed to PILAG.

 

The passing of this Bill aligns with the Government’s strategic priorities of training and developing public sector leaders, focused on service delivery.

 

The PILAG will be an independent statutory and have its own board of management.

 

The chairman of the board will be an appointed chairman engaged through proper executive search as a fit and proper person defined in the PILAG Act.

 

However, the Institute is not a Department of the National Public Service and is not subject to the application of the Public Services Management Act 2014.

 

Meantime, the Institute has all the necessary power to do all things in connection with the performance of its functions.

Author: Freddy Mou

Plans For Law To Monitor Foreign Researchers In PNG

Minister for Higher Education, Research Science and technology, Pila Niningi, has assured that amendments are to be made to monitor foreign research coming into the country.

 

He said it is time to have this legislation passed to ensure research done is conducted in a manner that benefits PNG.

 

The Minister was responding to recommendations made by the PNG Science and Technology, today in Port Moresby, when attending their 3rd Meeting of the year.

 

The academics mostly stressed that many researchers are coming into the country at will and conducting research to gather and prosper in their academic qualifications.

 

This they said needs to be urgently monitored and regulated so that Higher Institutions are aware and collaborate to find out what purpose of research.

 

He says in this way the research can be justifiable if it is in the interest of the country other than personal gains.

 

The Minister gave further assurance that this is very serious and will be brought to the National Executive Council to be deliberated with.

Author: Tracey Parr of Loop PNG.

Education to introduce new structure: Kuman

Source: The National

EDUCATION Minister Nick Kuman, pictured, says there will be a new education structure introduced next year.

 
“The one-six-six school structure in the national education system will be implemented in 2018, starting with the National Capital Districts schools,” Kuman said.

 
He mentioned the plan during the Waigani Christian College graduation in Port Moresby on Friday.

 
“In this structure, each student will spend 13 years of schooling comprising one year elementary education, six years primary education and six years secondary education.
Kuman said the structure would allow all students to continue to grade 12.

 
“A child will start formal education at the age of five and is expected to complete secondary schooling at grade 12 at the age of 17 or 18,” Kuman said.

 
“The basis of introducing one-six-six school structure is to improve the quality of education and accessibility.

 
“The one-six-six school structure will have all children completing elementary to grade 12.”

 
He said the Waigani Christian College was a private institution regulated by the Education Department which had this structure.

 
“As the department looks forward to implementing the one-six-six structure, Waigani Christian College is already implementing this,” Kuman said.

 
“I have directed the abolishment of Grade Eight and Grade 10 examinations for selection purposes.

 
“This will be abolished over time as we create adequate space to take every student.”

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